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Search Results 50 to 99 of about 499 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> sure. >> it's a miami thing. >> that terrifies me, what that woman said. >> miami, large american city of two and a half million people located on florida's southern coast that has been clean and sober going on six weeks now. the center of finance and trade, miami will remain by the grace of god a substance redefinition -- destination for millions of tourists. mammy -- miami has spent every day in a haze of drug and alcohol. the city barely recall saw its most important moments including 1836 construction, incorporation as a city, or the suburban sprawl of the past 50 years which is pretty much just a blur. mamie cleaned up for bid in the late 1980's, but after the sudden appearance of hurricane andrew the city went on a monthlong cocaine bender finally hitting rock bottom with the collapse of 2008 when travois nearly everyone who cared about it. still, miami has a new outlook on life and will take it one day with the largest population of cubans in the estates of the time. >> dave barry. >> he does not exist. persist with there fantasy if you wish, but you are mentally ill and diluted
district, but for the city at-large and for a point of reference, much of the monies that were spent last year were spent reconverting the horseman campus to continue to develop the former bryant campus for international high school. to redo the isa campus and to finish building the brand-new tech 21 career building at the john o'connell campus. so there is a lot of really exciting projects that this work has funded and next year we have a number of similar projects targeted including trying to replace the final remaining modular what's buildings that we are renting with permanent classroom buildings. so with that, i would ask if there have any questions that you might have and hopefully you will approve the report. thank you. >> thank you; there are no public speakers for this item. any comments from the board or superintendents? >> no, but i read it. >> it's right here. >> i move the recommendations. >> we already did. roll call, please. >> have i one question? >> commissioner? >> thank you president yee. this report is annual or every five years? >> it's annual. >> it's ac
are no or low cost but others like caa have large potential costs to the city and we didn't do that analysis. >> there is financial considerations. there is political considerations, and so if we have a document -- if we go to the next lafco meeting in january -- whenever it is. we will see the schedule later. it might be too quick to do that in a month and a different resolution for that, but i think that si process that is essential that we go to and provide a road map. >> and the last page in the report and lists the recommendations and near term, mid-term or long-term so the next two to three or three to seven or longer term so we started that work but certainly a lot more to do. >> i also have a question on the emphasis on pg&e and i am wondering if you could talk more about that. i am curious why there is equal treatment of clean power sf and pg&e since you have a program with clean power sf where the city has more control over it and i am wondering if you could talk about that, and by the way was pg&e on the task force? >> yes pg&e was a member of the task force and they did ask at
to put off protesters by sealing off large parts of the city and closing off metro stations. hundreds of armed police and riot troops are on duty. but the protests are spreading beyond the capital. there are vigils and demonstrations across the country. rape is the fastest growing crime in india, an incident reported every 20 minutes, yet the issue has largely been ignored by the authorities until now. violence against women in india is making news around the world and the politicians are not taking -- paying attention. they say that this young woman's death will not be in vain. she is being called out in the his daughter, but she spent her final hours at a hospital in singapore. she suffered from severe organ failure as a result of her terrible injuries. >> her family is shattered by this development. at the same time, they realized it the best medical attention was provided to hurt and in the and it was the scale of the injuries that was too much. >> her body is being flown back from singapore for last rites as india which for the arrival of the victim. many are coming to terms with
that that department and the city at large respond to complaints about bed bugs; it has become more prevalent. it has become a lot more of the issue as the media gives more attention to this. the city has adopted protocols to respond to this in a more timely manner. to get back to the report, the mission sro collaborative, senior action collaborative, we went out and we interviewed over 150 sro tenants who live in chinatown, mission, central city area, seniors, people with disabilities. we had a wide range of questions. it is focused on being a needs assessment. to see what sort of needs the population was facing so we could identify recommendations slowly work to implement those recommendations. we have a couple of other people who will speak about those things today. i will turn it over to jessica at this point to talk a little bit more about what the results of the report were and some of the recommendations that came out of that report. >> thank you. thanks so much to the council for having us here and thank you to joanna fraguli for coordinating this. it is exciting work. it is won
to breathe it in and it will stunt your lung growth. it has now been proven, large cities-- the l.a.'s, the detroit's, the chicago's, where they have a lot of heavy vehicle traffic-- it's actually causing stunted lung growth. probably the first generation that may die at an earlier age than the current generation. but children from two to 102, again, eight million children under 17 years old with asthma in the u.s. >> so you just... they'll take... 'cause it's a gel-cap. >> it's a soft, little, teeny, soft gel-cap, little, teeny, gel-cap... >> so easy. >> and if someone doesn't want to actually swallow it, you can actually put a little pin in it and squeeze it on their food, if they're two or three years old, but it's also very good for pregnant women. how many times have you heard, you can't have a pregnant woman take anything? a diet rich in omega 3s will help the brain development of the child, actually even from the time the woman is pregnant. from the time a woman conceives, the first 24 months the child's brain triples in size. doctors across the country are embracing omega
the city on large projects can say this can pencil out or can't. it should stop some fly by night stuff people tried to propose and it serves that purpose. it's vetted by harvey rose and says yeah it can fly if all of these things come into play. they come into place at the time of the term sheet and the last negotiations. they're sort of in my opinion the fiscal fiscallablity study is like an eir and takes the big box and study everything in the box and see whether it's possible, what are the mitigations, and then guild within that box. the same thing with the fiscal feasibility study it's to look at it and come down to the actual terms. i know it's a very aggressive plan. the concept to play in arena in 2017 blew everyone's mind and still does. i don't know if it can be done. i really don't in this city but i think there is a responsibility of the cac, of the commission and certainly the board of supervisors to see whether it's possible and i look forward to the process, so as long as people understand that this city works by process, and usually does it pretty well. thank you.
is becoming more of a public recreation and open space access for the city at large which really gets integrated with mixed use development sites that are identified within the waterfront land use plan, and in carrying out this planning process originally there was another advisory group that was created that recommended a plan to the port commission at the time. the port commission in 1997 approved that plan and upon approving the plan then the port also then went to work with the planning commission and the board of supervisors and mb dc to outline the policies appropriate for the waterfront with the city's planned policies for the waterfront and to align the various jurisdictions and to try to give careful and consistent focus what should be happening along that waterfront. as i mentioned there are mixed use development opportunities that are identified in the land use plan, and the bryant street opportunity area is one of those within the south beach area consisting of pier 30-32 and sea wall lot 330. during the plan process it was always seen as an opportunity to create these m
which were moving into areas it had been difficult for many years, and so what is it the city can, would do in order to -- for that not to happen? >> planning. >> there is obviously a large silence here. plaps the director -- >> it's a private corporate decision to stay open or not. the question i think that is appropriate for the city and the successor agency depending on the location whether other stores can fill those spaces? and one of the things -- just to back up i had the same concern. those stores represent an opportunity and what we were calling food deserts in the city for a long time so i was going to talk to the office of economic development to work with if not them with potentially other stores to take those spaces and if fresh and easy wanted to lease them to other operator versus just walking away. >> one thing i observed and we talked about retail, large grocery stores that my observation was fresh and easy in a city other than san francisco in other food starved neighborhoods, food store starved neighborhoods i saw a certain lack of relevance for the type of foods the
for itself and the city at large mountain on mountain of trouble. to build districts that are custom made for easy crime is idiotic. yes, that is what we do. this was written in 1961. public peace, the street and the sidewalk is not kept primarily by the police. it's kept by intricate unconscious voluntary controls and standards among the people themselves and enforced by the people themselves. no amount of police can enforce civilization or the normal casual enforcement of it has broken down. a well used city street is apt to be a safe city street. a deserted street is apt to be unsafe. there must be eyes upon the street. eyes belonging to those we call the natural proprietors of the street. the building on a main street equipped to handle strangers and ensure the safety of residents and strangers must be oriented to the street. the natural proprietors can not turn their backs and leave it blind. jane jacobs was a life student of urban plan scption ensured criticism going into a male dosm nated field. they called her a housewife and a crazy dame and organized grass-roots effort
medallions are required to operate cabs in many large cities including new york. they were first issued in the big apple during the great depression. >> back in 1937, this little piece of tin sold for $10 each. >> his grandfather bought one of the first badges and medallion financial was born. the company has seen quite a return on that first investment and on hundreds more medallions it bought since then. back in the late '70s when the checker cabs were cruising the streets of new york city, a taxi medallion would set you back less than $100,000. now this piece of metal on the front of your cab will set you back more than a million bugs. >> i don't think we ever thought it would hit a million dollar price. they have gone up 15% per year, 70 years. outperforming dow, gold, nasdaq, real estate. you name it. >> analysts marvel at the company's track record. unlike most banks, medal i don't know never had default on taxi loan. >> real estate lending someone defaults it is years before banks get money back. it is terrific collateral. the medallion is the little tin. if somebody doesn't pay
. in westchester county two large cities, yonkers and vernon. [talking over each other] >> of those 80% of people with legal handguns were they in tending and plotting who they were going to attack or were they on the street? what was the climate? >> various array of different crimes but now what we have is crimes tend >> with technology. stuart: i will break in for a second. i want to give you breaking news from the environmental protection agency. the administrator lisa jackson says she will step down. she has been on the job four years. she announced her departure in a statement that came out today. no particular reason for leaving but she says she was ready for new challenges, time with a family and opportunity to make a difference. lisa jackson, administrator of the epa will step down. back to you for a second, peter. we have a list published in the newspaper. everyone who knows where the legal handguns are in each house, name and address of the person who has got them. in newton, conn. we had a dreadful case of legally hunt handguns used to the terrible way by someone who was clearly mental
to communicate with the city at large. lisa pagan from our office will address issues and concerns that supervisor kim brought up. peter all bert from the mta will be discussing the transportation survey and assessment that's currently ongoing for the waterfront and how that will impact the environmental review process for this project. we have byron the director of development from the port to discuss briefly the port's waterfront land use plan which we think provides very important context for why this location is appropriate to consider an arena. and then we will have craig talk about the actual design. it's really tremendous that we have craig here to present the design himself because really no one does it justice the way he does. after that we'll just have very brief comments from two other departments, san francisco fire department and the mayor's office of disability to talk about the ways in which both fire station and fire boats can hopefully be collated at this site. and also to talk about the outreach we've begun with the mayor's office of disability when we think about
more local or large city looks david roeder rights for the sun times, one of my favorites and put out a piece a couple days ago where he took three washington policy institutes and put together some of their research. he found if you just looked at large cities foreclosures were about 6% but the record is 6.1%. if you loosked at just chicago 8.7% foreclosure rate versus a year ago, year over year at 8.8. so only 0.1 better. if you specifically looked at cook county, their third quarter prices were down 3% year over year. you have the good, the bad, and it gets very difficult to just come up with one lump sum. one thing we can walk away with, it seems as though housing has bottomed. many states deal with the core process of foreclosures and there have been breakthroughs there. i've talked with many experts who really think there is still a shadow inventory of foreclosures that are going to be freed into 2013. you try to figure it out. the last, well maybe this is the credit market side of a possible positive for u.s. treasuries or some of the good ones like boon's. there's a "wall stre
urban cities, 50% of the kids are dropping out. almost every large urban district is dysfunctional. philadelphia is at the highest level of dysfunction. there was a need to engage students. the normal curriculum is boring, and kids are disinterested. today what we are going to do, the first thing is we are going to move the gt over here. all right? ready-- one, two, three. so, the evx team is an afterschool program. we build and design hybrid and electric vehicles. we had success the very first year. the students won the local science fair which was a first for... for students from west philadelphia high school. from there, it just organically grew. >> here, put it over here. the mission of the evx team this year is to be serious competitors in the automotive x prize. the automotive x prize is a $10 million competition that's invited teams from around the world to develop viable vehicles that get over 100 miles per gallon. we're the only high school in the world that has thrown our hat in the ring. >> to all the other teams in the x prize competition, you are going to lose. >> you
. this is such a cake question. what is the large of the city in maryland. >> baltimore. >> going to give that to reed. >> that was pretty easy. >> that was cake. >> reporter: second down, there are three downtown areas along the port. the inner harbor, sells point and the italy. which was featured in the movie sleepless in seattle. >> south point. >> reporter: santana moss played at the u with this -- >> ed read. >> i had it. but too slow. >> reporter: fourth down. you need this to stay alive. cal ripken
, new york -- at least where you have a large big city and minorities, they like to cut them off. >> the thing is, there are no rules in the constitution about picking electors to the electoral college. every state gets to -- >> why do they -- >> it became the consensus position over time. that winner takes all. if you wanted to do the system, could you make the argument that you should drop off electoral votes by population in every state. that would be fair if you did that in every state, in which case it would reflect the popular vote. but that's not what they are doing here and they tried to do this before this election and even a more weighted way. if you win the congressional district, you get the electoral from that district and under that situation, obama winning pennsylvania would have gotten seven out of the 20 electoral votes. >> ron, fb you're in a minority community, it seems that you want it the way it is now because leverage in from michigan to detroit, for example. or chicago. if it was just every person and you didn't give that bloc vote power to people, be they
, still strong emotions. despite a large group of nudists at city hall -- >> shame on you! shame on you! >> reporter: -- the public nudity ban barely passed during its first vote in late november. but for allen he didn't want it passed at all. >> you have the action of a small group of people is what's going on. >> reporter: public nudity is at the forefront once again. it passed first time in a 6-5 vote. >> i don't think the ban is necessary. i think san francisco is a really open place. i don't have a problem with public nudity. i think people can clues or not to -- can choose or not to. >> if i had children, i wouldn't want them having to look at that. it's not -- it makes me angry. >> reporter: if passed, the ordinance would effectively put a ban on nudity in most places. the exceptions to the ban would be during permitted parades, fairs and festivals. at first this woman was for public nudity and expression but with a family now, she's for the ban instead. >> i didn't have a problem at all. but when the die-hard nudists -- now it seems to have gone a bit far. >> reporter: nudists s
for being had largely disappeared. if you think about every one of america's older, colder cities, they were all part of solving a transportation problem. they were all nodes on a transportation network. if you go back to 1816, we as americans sat on the edge of an enormously wealthy continent that was virtually inaccessible. in 1816 it cost as much to move goods 30 miles over land as it did to ship them across the entire atlantic ocean. it was so expensive to get goods in. over the course of the 19th century, we've built an amazing network. we built canals like the erie and illinois and michigan canals, railroads atticaals, and cities grew up. at buffalo, the western terminus of the erie canal. the oldest cities were typically where the river meets the sea, like boston and new york, but every one of america's 20 largest cities was on a major waterway. chicago was a future that was made it the linchpin of a watery arc that went from new york to new orleans. and industries grew up around these transportation hubs. chicago's most famous is, of course, its stockyards, and that's what you're loo
, everyone. >> reporter: in september, new york became the first u.s. city to restrict sales of large-sized sodas and other sugary drinks. restaurants, fast food chains and movie theaters will only be allowed to serve cups that old 470 milliliters or less. that's a third of the largest cups now available. the deciding factor was the city's ballooning medical costs. in new york city alone obesity-related medical costs come to over $3.8 billion a year. if obesity rates continue to rise, the financial burden will be crippling. >> this is the single biggest step any city has ever taken to curb obesity. it is not the last step that lot of cities are going to take. we believe that it will help save lives. >> reporter: the beverage industry is fiercely opposed to the ban. workers have been holding protest outside new york city hall. >> they should really take a stand and make sure they're getting exercise and not just trying to cut the size of the drink. >> reporter: they have launched an all-out war against the city claiming the ban is invalid. many movie theaters the are also voicing their
hill, at one time second street ended at howard. at that point, there was a large hill. the wealthy people of san francisco lived on top of the hill, and churches were built along howard. then the city fathers in the 1920's let us knock down the hill, let us extend second street, and it finishes at the ballpark now. as you move south along second, that whole area, you get into rock. many of these old warehouse buildings, as you approach rincon hill, are sitting on rock. if you go down to king street, which is the street that fronts the ballpark, if you cross the street from the ballpark and the look on the sidewalk, there is actually a little brass plates that depict the location of the bluff that existed, the transition from the beach to the vertical cliffs that existed at second street. at second and king. all of that was taken down, and they have built warehouses. now at his condominium developments. and portions of mission bay. the first building of mission bay, third and townsend -- i am sorry, third and king, it is a rock site. if you go further into mission bay, it goes from
waste away from the hub of civilization, which enabled cities to grow. . >> you have a large bowl, a drive motor and another motor with a planetary gearbox with differential pressure inside there. the large mass up there spinning separating the solids from the liquid. we have to prevent about once a month, we go in there grease those, change the oil, check the vibration levels. the operators can tell just by the hum of that machine that it's a harmonic noise emitted that it's out of balance and the machine needs to be cleaned. it will start vibrating and we have vibration analysis machines that will come over here and check the levels. so it's kind of an on-going thing that you have to stay on top of on a daily basis. >> handled properly, you take organic residuals, as we call them, that are leftovers of our society and turn them back into some energy. and we have another ability to take that sludge and get a nutrient value for crops there. we actually are running a kind of composting energy recovery system. >> well, this is a dirty job. we try to do it safely and we try to do it
and into the neighborhood. city crews tell us piles of large debris plugged up the culvert and the force of the flood water started washing away the earth between the culvert and the road. that's when the pavement collapsed on top of the utility lines. there could have been raw sue -- sewage running down the treat. >> it was a moving target. we saul the road had begun to dip, appeared to be failing. we called central sand. they were working on top of the failing road, and they worked very rapidly through the morning, and were able to get the line in before the road finally collapsed. reporter: this chest of drawers is among the debris that washed down the creek and plugged up the culvert. you can see logs, tree stumps and an assortment of garbage. the city still doesn't have an accurate read how many homes are affected but says the residents will probably by without water throughout the night. interestingly the same culvert was plugged and caused serious flooding in 1997. back livement you can see the hole in the ground. hey several utility crews out here trying to restore service and other crews are tryin
covers the 9.4 irrigated acres that comprise over four city blocks of that large and iconic park. the alamo square project that we propose, this mou would cover anyway would cover this need within the park. the current system there we have a leaking irrigation system that is over 30 years old. more stunningingly we have a corroded coupler line, over 70 years old which far exceeds life cycle of that time. we have low water pressure in the park, which impacts our water distribution in the existing irrigation system. we have an inefficient irrigation system design and layout difficult to maintain lawn and steep slopes and underutilized areas. this is the actual need we have. in june of this year we were awarded by the puc the -- a grant in the amount of 1,318,485 to undertake this project, which requires the mou before you today. that particular project we have proposed would address these particular items. it would replace irrigation system. replace that completely quick cover line, install a booster pump to increase water pressure, improve irrigation system layout and design, repl
you, judge. >> new studies shows stall construction projects are on the rise in america's large of the city. according to a new report from builders there are hundreds of vacant lots and half finished projects around new york city despite all of them having the necessary permits for construction. now the news from brooklyn. that is this about? >>guest: well, there are e monuments in a bad economy. a finish which is one of several hundrednd at the city like that where the construction just stops. the workers are one day and suddenly they never show up again and they are e and quiet for years. this is a legacy of the 2008 financial crisis having to do with long-term institutional borrowing and lending and that is a problem. look at the numbers: 691 inactive sites up 17 percent in new york city since february. 45 percent dormant since 1999. it is run out of money or a combination of running out or fought having enough sales or the market for rentals does not appear to be strong enough to justify completion. >>guest: the american institute of architects are putting together develope
Search Results 50 to 99 of about 499 (some duplicates have been removed)

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